Research Perdekamp’sche Emotions Methode – Day Two

Second part of a sciencific research (2/2)

The main objective of this current master thesis (2014) is a research of a contemporary acting
method called Perdekamp’sche Emotions Methode (short: PEM).
In collaboration with the Open Acting Academy (short: OAA) it evolves an innovative
project. An experimental arrangement is demonstrating how to measure emotions with
technical know-how. The experiment includes for example the visualization of an
increasement of skin temperature during an emotional reaction. All events will be
recorded (accompanied by documents) by digital cameras and instruments. These
records will be made in a similar environment to a laboratory with actors from the OAA.
Four actors will take advantage of the PEM. This method allows the actor to produce
real emotion authentically.
The acting method PEM is developed especially for professional actors. The test
arrangement is being set-up to develop an interesting and even better looking
visualization of emotions. State-of-the-art appliances are used to measure and to
display changes of parameters. A frame is being captured with an infrared camera. In
correlation with a biofeedback (it is a medical tool to provide body monitoring) these
parameters were analyzed and evaluated. First this scientific analysis aims to
elaborate and make a visualization of PEM. Second the analysis detect actors
emotions and make those visible on the IR monitor. Eventually IR research confirms
slight skin temperature variability.

Supervision Marcus Joseph Weiss (Direction)

Austria, Europe 2013-14

Credits:
www.schauspielschule.at
www.fhstp.ac.at

source

Biofeedback for stress related health problems

Biofeedback can be applied to stress and anxiety related health problems such as tension headache, palpitations, overbreathing, hyperventilation, fatigue and burnout.

Biofeedback training enables people to understand what the effects of (chronic) stress are and how they can reduce stress levels.

For more information about using NeXus for biofeedback and neurofeedback applications, please visit our website:
http://www.mindmedia.info

source

1-6 Microvascular Decompression MVD Dr. Parrish Neurosurgeon

Click More http://www.MyTrigeminalNeuralgiaStory.com AWC 4398 1-6 Microvascular Decompression MVD Click Dr.Parrish Neurosurgeon TN Tic douloureux Facial Pain Electric Shocks. TNA BrianNelson123 Suicide Painful Jannetta Association Teflon Nerve
THIS WEBSITE IS DESIGNED TO HAVE EACH TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA patient tell there story from the beginning of the problem to the current status which is understandably changing daily as the body processes more of the pain. My personal story is very long and and be seen at w htttp[://www.IamFightingCancer.com
Important words found on this site.
Trigeminal Neuralgia Minneapolis TN Pain Personal Story, Balloon Compression Mentor, dysesthesia, bad feeling constant spasm. excruciating pains, Henry, Pneumonia Electrical Shocks, Shirley, Shelly Wilson, Support Group, Education, Association, Stabbing, Jolts, Suicide Disease, Neuropathic, rare Disorder, Treatment, destructive surgery, Procedure, Microvascular Decompression, tic douloureux Marge Prietz
Trigeminal Neuralgia Extreme Facial Pain TN Websites insert. YouTube. From
NelsonIdeas.com Trigeminal Neuralgia Extreme Facial Pain TN Websites insert.

Websites insert. My Trigeminal Neuralgia Extreme Facial Pain TN Websites
http:/./www.NelsonIdeas.com

Click Dental Education Trigeminal Neuralgia Extreme Facial Pain
http://www.NewMedicalDirectories.com/Trigeminal-Neuralgia-Dental/Dentist-Dentists.html

Click Trigeminal Neuralgia Patient Painful-Stories
http://www.BrianNelsonConsulting.com/trigeminal-neuralgia-tn/patient-painful-stories.html

Click My Trigeminal Neuralgia (TN) Story only http://www.PartyTentCity.com/mytnstory.html

Click My Story on TN Brian N
http://www.PartyTentCity.com/trigeminal-neuralgia-tn-tmj-my-story/directory.html

Click Trigeminal Neuralgia Slide Show Story of Pain http://www.NewMedicalDirectories.com/Trigeminal-Neuralgia-Slide-Show/Draft.html

Click Medical Data Base Medical Costs More Expensive Due to Non Use of Technology http://www.briannelsonconsulting.com/medical-data-base/faq-info.html

Click MyTrigeminal Neuralgia Story Directory http://www.MyTrigeminalNeuralgiaStory.com

Click Slide Show Draft for New TN Patients. http://www.newmedicaldirectories.com/Trigeminal-Neuralgia-Slide-Show/Draft.html

Click-Trigeminal Neuralgia Assn Page 1
http://newmedicaldirectories.com/Trigeminal-Neuralgia-Association/TN-Facial-Pain.html

Click-Trigeminal Neuralgia Assn Page 2
http://newmedicaldirectories.com/Trigeminal-Neuralgia-Association/TN-Facial-Pain-2.html

Click What is Trigeminal Neuragia? Portland,OR Slide Show
http://www.NewMedicalDirectories.com/Trigeminal-Neuralgia-Slide-Show/Draft.html

Click Trigeminal Neuralgia National Conference
http://www.NewMedicalDirectories.com/Trigeminal-Neuralgia-Slide-Show/Draft.html

Click Trigeminal Neuralgia Brian’s Journal Tic Douloureux (TN) FacialPain-Cancer
http://www.BrianNelsonConsulting.com/trigeminal-neuralgia-tn/faq-info.html
http://www.BrianNelsonConsulting.com/trigeminal-neuralgia-tn/faq-info.html

Click Page 1. Trigeminal Neuralgia http://www.BrianNelsonConsulting.com/trigeminal-neuralgia-tn/faq-info.html

Click Page 2 Trigeminal Neuralgia
http://www.briannelsonconsulting.com/trigeminal-neuralgia-tn/faq-info2.html

Click Page 3 Trigeminal Neuralgia
http://www.briannelsonconsulting.com/trigeminal-neuralgia-tn/faq-info3.htm

Click Page 4 Trigeminal Neuralgia
http://www.BrianNelsonConsulting.com/trigeminal-neuralgia-tn/faq-info4.html

Click MyTrigeminal Neuralgia Stories Directory
http://www.MyTrigeminalNeuralgiaStory.com/Index.html

Click Brian’s TN Story Quck Version
http://www.MyTrigeminalNeuralgiaStory.com/BrianNelson/TN1.html

Click Shirley’s Story Trigeminal Neuralgia
http://www.MyTrigeminalNeuralgiaStory.com/ShirleyH/TN3.html

Click Sand’s Story TN
WHAT IS TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA?

TN (Trigeminal Neuralgia) is a pain that is described as among the most acute known to mankind. TN produces excruciating, lightning strikes of facial pain, typically near the nose, lips, eyes or ears.
It is a disorder of the trigeminal nerve, which is the fifth and largest cranial nerve.
TN (Trigeminal Neuralgia / tic douloureux) is a disorder of the fifth cranial (trigeminal) nerve that causes episodes of intense, stabbing, electric shock-like pain in the areas of the face where the branches of the nerve are distributed – lips, eyes, nose, scalp, forehead, upper jaw, and lower jaw. By many, it’s called the “suicide disease”. A less common form of the disorder called “Atypical Trigeminal Neuralgia” may cause less intense, constant, dull burning or aching pain, sometimes with occasional electric shock-like stabs. Both forms of the disorder most often affect one side of the face, but some patients experience pain at different times on both sides. Onset of symptoms occurs most often after age 50, but cases are known in children and even infants. Something as simple and routine as brushing the teeth, putting on makeup or even a slight breeze can trigger an attack, resulting in sheer agony for the individual. Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is not fatal, but it is universally considered to be the most painful affliction known to medical practice. Initial treatment of TN is usually by means of anti-convulsant drugs, such as Tegretol or Neurontin. Some anti-depressant drugs also have significant pain relieving effects. Should medication be ineffective or if it produces undesirable side effects, neurosurgical procedures are available to relieve pressure on the nerve or to reduce nerve sensitivity. Some patients report having reduced or relieved pain by means of alternative medical therapies such as acupuncture, chiropractic adjustment, self-hypnosis or meditation.
http://www.MyTrigeminalNeuralgiaStory.com/SandiW/TN4.html
What is Trigeminal Neuralgia?
Trigeminal neuralgia (TN), also called tic douloureux, is a chronic pain condition that causes extreme, sporadic, sudden burning or shock-like face pain that lasts anywhere from a few seconds to as long as 2 minutes per episode. The intensity of pain can be physically and mentally incapacitating. TN pain is typically felt on one side of the jaw or cheek. Episodes can last for days, weeks, or months at a time and then disappear for months or years. In the days before an episode begins, some patients may experience a tingling or numbing sensation or a somewhat constant and aching pain. The attacks often worsen over time, with fewer and shorter pain-free periods before they recur. The intense flashes of pain can be triggered by vibration or contact with the cheek (such as when shaving, washing the face, or applying makeup), brushing teeth, eating, drinking, talking, or being exposed to the wind. TN occurs most often in people over age 50, but it can occur at any age, and is more common in women than in men. There is some evidence that the disorder runs in families, perhaps because of an inherited pattern of blood vessel formation. Although sometimes debilitating, the disorder is not life-threatening.
The presumed cause of TN is a blood vessel pressing on the trigeminal nerve in the head as it exits the brainstem. TN may be part of the normal aging process but in some cases it is the associated with another disorder, such as multiple sclerosis or other disorders characterized by damage to the myelin sheath that covers certain nerves.
Is there any treatment?
Because there are a large number of conditions that can cause facial pain, TN can be difficult to diagnose. But finding the cause of the pain is important as the treatments for different types of pain may differ. Treatment options include medicines such as anticonvulsants and tricyclic antidepressants, surgery, and complementary approaches. Typical analgesics and opioids are not usually helpful in treating the sharp, recurring pain caused by TN. If medication fails to relieve pain or produces intolerable side effects such as excess fatigue, surgical treatment may be recommended. Several neurosurgical procedures are available. Some are done on an outpatient basis, while others are more complex and require hospitalization. Some patients choose to manage TN using complementary techniques, usually in combination with drug treatment. These techniques include acupuncture, biofeedback, vitamin therapy, nutritional therapy, and electrical stimulation of the nerves.
What is the prognosis?
The disorder is characterized by recurrences and remissions, and successive recurrences may incapacitate the patient. Due to the intensity of the pain, even the fear of an impending attack may prevent activity. Trigeminal neuralgia is not fatal.
What research is being done?
Within the NINDS research programs, trigeminal neuralgia is addressed primarily through studies associated with pain research. NINDS vigorously pursues a research program seeking new treatments for pain and nerve damage with the ultimate goal of reversing debilitating conditions such as trigeminal neuralgia. NINDS has notified research investigators that it is seeking grant applications both in basic and clinical pain research.
An Alternate Strategy
Instead of waiting for the pain to become intractable or the medications toxic, an individual with trigeminal neuralgia has the option to request early surgery. This has a number of potential advantages:
• Avoid years of medication and intermittent pain
• Avoid facing surgery when old or infirm
• If the person has a vascular loop, early microvascular decompression will increase the possibility of a successful operation with decreased risk of recurrence (evidence suggests better outcomes and lower recurrence rate the shorter the interval between onset of symptoms and nerve decompression)
How To Find Out If You Have a Vascular Loop
The conventional MRI scans used to rule out the presence of a brain tumor or multiple sclerosis as a cause of a patients face pain are not adequate to visualize the trigeminal nerve or an associated blood vessel. Fortunately, the continued improvement in MRI neuro-imaging now makes it possible to visualize both. The technique, which is called 3-D volume acquisition, is performed with contrast injection and utilizes thin cuts (0.8mm), without gaps similar to what was developed for MRI angiography and venography. The trigeminal nerve is easily visualized in the axial plane when the MRI series is centered at the midpoint of the fourth ventricle. To ensure an adequate evaluation, the nerve should be seen on three adjacent cuts. Early studies indicate that when an offending vessel is present it will be detected 80% of the of the time. With continued imaging improvements this percentage will definitely increase. Click here for UCSD Trigeminal Neuralgia Sequence Parameters for Seimens and GE MR Scanners.

Surgical Options: Non-Destructive Procedures
The only non-destructive procedure which reliably relieves the symptoms of Trigeminal Neuralgia is Microvascular Decompression (MVD). This involves surgical exploration with the operating microscope and visualization of the junction where the Trigeminal nerve enters the base of the brain, followed by coagulation or moving and padding away any compressing blood vessels. The advantage is pain relief without numbness in the majority of patients, which usually lasts indefinitely. If the pain recurs after a MVD, which it does in 10-15% of patients, it can usually be controlled with low dose Tegretol® or Neurontin®. If the pain continues, it will require a repeat MVD or one of the destructive procedures.
Surgical Options: Destructive Procedures
There are multiple destructive procedures which are beneficial in the treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia. The most common of which are glycerol injections, gamma knife radiation, electrocoagulation, and balloon compression. These procedures are all based on interrupting the pain by partial damage to Trigeminal nerve fibers. Generally the more numbness they produce, the longer they last. The specific advantages and disadvantages need to be discussed with the surgeon performing the procedure. These procedures are recommended for patients who have failed MVD or are not candidates for major surgery.
Comments
Treatment is always individualized. All of the options above should be considered in consultation with a neurosurgeon familiar in their use.
Recommendations
Based on the data currently available, and in an effort to maximize quality of life, we recommend the following:
Patients with less than 10 year life expectancy
Refer for destructive procedure if pain not controlled medically without significant side effects
Patients with more than 10 but less than 20 year life expectancy
Consider destructive procedure
May abolish need for continued increasing medications
Will make medical therapy easier even if fails
Patients with more than 20 year life expectancy
Perform thin cut MRI with 3-D Volume Acquisition
If vessel present recommend MVD

25 ARTICLE SECTIONS From the Mayo Clinic.
Trigeminal neuralgia http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/trigeminal-neuralgia/DS00446

Introduction
Signs and symptoms
Causes
When to seek medical advice
Screening and diagnosis
Treatment
Coping skills

Introduction
Imagine having a jab of lightning-like pain shoot through your face when you brush your teeth or put on makeup. Sound excruciating? If you have trigeminal neuralgia, attacks of such pain are frequent and can often seem unbearable.
You may initially experience short, mild attacks, but trigeminal neuralgia can progress, causing longer, more frequent bouts of searing pain. These painful attacks can be spontaneous, but they may also be provoked by even mild stimulation of your face, including brushing your teeth, shaving or putting on makeup. The pain of trigeminal neuralgia may occur in a fairly small area of your face, or it may spread rapidly over a wider area.
Because of the variety of treatment options available, having trigeminal neuralgia doesn’t necessarily mean you’re doomed to a life of pain. Doctors usually can effectively manage trigeminal neuralgia, either with medications or surgery.
Signs and symptoms
An attack of trigeminal neuralgia can last from a few seconds to about a minute. Some people have mild, occasional twinges of pain, while other people have frequent, severe, electric-shock-like pain. The condition tends to come and go. You may experience attacks of pain off and on all day, or even for days or weeks at a time. Then, you may experience no pain for a prolonged period of time. Remission is less common the longer you have trigeminal neuralgia.
People who have experienced severe trigeminal neuralgia have described the pain as:
Lightning-like or electric-shock-like
Shooting
Jabbing
Like having live wires in your face
Trigeminal neuralgia usually affects just one side of your face. The pain may affect just a portion of one side of your face or spread in a wider pattern. Rarely, trigeminal neuralgia can affect both sides of your face, but not at the same time.
Causes

Branches of the trigeminal nerve CLICK TO ENLARGE

The condition is called trigeminal neuralgia because the painful facial areas are those served by one or more of the three branches of your trigeminal nerve. This large nerve originates deep inside your brain and carries sensation from your face to your brain. The pain of trigeminal neuralgia is due to a disturbance in the function of the trigeminal nerve. Trigeminal neuralgia is also known as tic douloureux.
The cause of the pain usually is due to contact between a normal artery or vein and the trigeminal nerve at the base of your brain. This places pressure on the nerve as it enters your brain and causes the nerve to misfire. Physical nerve damage or stress may be the initial trigger for trigeminal neuralgia.
After the trigeminal nerve leaves your brain and travels through your skull, it divides into three smaller branches, controlling sensation throughout your face:
The first branch controls sensation in your eye, upper eyelid and forehead.
The second branch controls sensation in your lower eyelid, cheek, nostril, upper lip and upper gum.
The third branch controls sensations in your jaw, lower lip, lower gum and some of the muscles you use for chewing.
You may feel pain in the area served by just one branch of the trigeminal nerve, or the pain may affect all branches on one side of your face.
Besides compression from blood vessel contact, other less frequent sources of pain to the trigeminal nerve may include:
Compression by a tumor
Multiple sclerosis
A stroke affecting the lower part of your brain, where the trigeminal nerve enters your central nervous system
A variety of triggers, many subtle, may set off the pain. These triggers may include:
Shaving
Stroking your face
Eating
Drinking
Brushing your teeth
Talking
Putting on makeup
Encountering a breeze
Smiling
Trigeminal neuralgia affects women more often than men. The disorder is more likely to occur in people who are older than 50. About 5 percent of people with trigeminal neuralgia have other family members with the disorder, which suggests a possible genetic cause in some cases.
When to seek medical advice
Some people mistake the pain of trigeminal neuralgia for a toothache or a headache. It’s not uncommon for people to believe that their facial pain is dental-related, particularly when the pain seems to stem from the gumline or is located near a tooth.
If you experience facial pain, particularly prolonged pain or pain that hasn’t gone away with use of over-the-counter pain relievers, see your dentist or doctor.
Screening and diagnosis
If you go to your dentist, an examination of your mouth can reveal whether a problem with your teeth or gums is causing your pain.
If you go to your doctor, he or she will want to ask about your medical history and have you describe your pain — how severe it is, what part of your face it affects, how long pain lasts and what seems to trigger episodes of pain. You’ll also undergo a neurologic examination. During this examination, your doctor examines and touches parts of your face to try to determine exactly where the pain is occurring and — if it appears that you have trigeminal neuralgia — which branches of the trigeminal nerve may be affected.
Your doctor may exclude other possible conditions based on your medical history, the examination, and a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of your head.
Treatment
Medications are the usual initial treatment for trigeminal neuralgia. Medications are often effective in lessening or blocking the pain signals sent to your brain. A number of drugs are available. If you stop responding to a particular medication or experience too many side effects, switching to another medication may work for you.
Medications
Carbamazepine (Tegretol, Carbatrol). Carbamazepine, an anticonvulsant drug, is the most common medication that doctors use to treat trigeminal neuralgia. In the early stages of the disease, carbamazepine controls pain for most people. However, the effectiveness of carbamazepine decreases over time. Side effects include dizziness, confusion, sleepiness and nausea.
Baclofen. Baclofen is a muscle relaxant. Its effectiveness may increase when it’s used in combination with carbamazepine or phenytoin. Side effects include confusion, nausea and drowsiness.
Phenytoin (Dilantin, Phenytek). Phenytoin, another anticonvulsant medication, was the first medication used to treat trigeminal neuralgia. Side effects include gum enlargement, dizziness and drowsiness.
Oxcarbazepine (Trileptal). Oxcarbazepine is another anticonvulsant medication and is similar to carbamazepine. Side effects include dizziness and double vision.
Doctors may sometimes prescribe other medications, such as lamotrignine (Lamictal) or gabapentin (Neurontin).
Some people with trigeminal neuralgia eventually stop responding to medications, or they experience unpleasant side effects. For those people, surgery, or a combination of surgery and medications, may be an option.
Surgery
The goal of a number of surgical procedures is to either damage or destroy the part of the trigeminal nerve that’s the source of your pain. Because the success of these procedures depends on damaging the nerve, facial numbness of varying degree is a common side effect. These procedures involve:
Alcohol injection. Alcohol injections under the skin of your face, where the branches of the trigeminal nerve leave the bones of your face, may offer temporary pain relief by numbing the areas for weeks or months. Because the pain relief isn’t permanent, you may need repeated injections or a different procedure.
Glycerol injection. This procedure is called percutaneous glycerol rhizotomy (PGR). “Percutaneous” means through the skin. Your doctor inserts a needle through your face and into an opening in the base of your skull. The needle is guided into the trigeminal cistern, a small sac of spinal fluid that surrounds the trigeminal nerve ganglion (the area where the trigeminal nerve divides into three branches) and part of its root. Images are made to confirm that the needle is in the proper location. After confirming the location, your doctor injects a small amount of sterile glycerol. After three or four hours, the glycerol damages the trigeminal nerve and blocks pain signals. Initially, PGR relieves pain in most people. However, some people have a recurrence of pain, and many experience facial numbness or tingling.
http://www.MyTrigeminalNeuralgiaStory.com
Balloon compression. In a procedure called percutaneous balloon compression of the trigeminal nerve (PBCTN), your doctor inserts a hollow needle through your face and into an opening in the base of your skull. Then, a thin, flexible tube (catheter) with a balloon on the end is threaded through the needle. The balloon is inflated with enough pressure to damage the nerve and block pain signals. PBCTN successfully controls pain in most people, at least for a while. Most people undergoing PBCTN experience facial numbness of varying degrees, and more than half experience nerve damage resulting in a temporary or permanent weakness of the muscles used to chew.
http://www.MyTrigeminalNeuralgiaStory.com
Electric current. A procedure called percutaneous stereotactic radiofrequency thermal rhizotomy (PSRTR) selectively destroys nerve fibers associated with pain. Your doctor threads a needle through your face and into an opening in your skull. Once in place, an electrode is threaded through the needle until it rests against the nerve root.
An electric current is passed through the tip of the electrode until it’s heated to the desired temperature. The heated tip damages the nerve fibers and creates an area of injury (lesion). If your pain isn’t eliminated, your doctor may create additional lesions.
PSRTR successfully controls pain in most people. Facial numbness is a common side effect of this type of treatment. The pain may return after a few years.
Microvascular decompression (MVD). A procedure called microvascular decompression (MVD) doesn’t damage or destroy part of the trigeminal nerve. Instead, MVD involves relocating or removing blood vessels that are in contact with the trigeminal root and separating the nerve root and blood vessels with a small pad. During MVD, your doctor makes an incision behind one ear. Then, through a small hole in your skull, part of your brain is lifted to expose the trigeminal nerve. If your doctor finds an artery in contact with the nerve root, he or she directs it away from the nerve and places a pad between the nerve and the artery. Doctors usually remove a vein that is found to be compressing the trigeminal nerve.
MVD can successfully eliminate or reduce pain most of the time, but as with all other surgical procedures for trigeminal neuralgia, pain can recur in some people.
http://www.MyTrigeminalNeuralgiaStory.com While MVD has a high success rate, it also carries risks. There are small chances of decreased hearing, facial weakness, facial numbness, double vision, and even a stroke or death. The risk of facial numbness is less with MVD than with procedures that involve damaging the trigeminal nerve.
Severing the nerve. A procedure called partial sensory rhizotomy (PSR) involves cutting part of the trigeminal nerve at the base of your brain. Through an incision behind your ear, your doctor makes a quarter-sized hole in your skull to access the nerve. This procedure usually is helpful, but almost always causes facial numbness. And it’s possible for pain to recur. If your doctor doesn’t find an artery or vein in contact with the trigeminal nerve, he or she won’t be able to perform an MVD, and a PSR may be done instead.
Radiation. Gamma-knife radiosurgery (GKR) involves delivering a focused, high dose of radiation to the root of the trigeminal nerve. The radiation damages the trigeminal nerve and reduces or eliminates the pain. Relief isn’t immediate and can take several weeks to begin. GKR is successful in eliminating pain more than half of the time. Sometimes the pain may recur. The procedure is painless and typically is done without anesthesia. Because this procedure is relatively new, the long-term risks of this type of radiation are not yet known.
• Coping skills
Living with trigeminal neuralgia can be difficult. The disorder may affect your interaction with friends and family, your productivity at work, and the overall quality of your life.
You may find that talking to a counselor or therapist can help you cope with the effects of trigeminal neuralgia, or you may find encouragement and understanding in a support group. Although support groups aren’t for everyone, they can be good sources of information. Group members often know about the latest treatments and tend to share their own experiences. If you’re interested, your doctor may be able to recommend a group in your area.

27 Background: Trigeminal neuralgia (TN), also known as tic douloureux, is a pain syndrome recognizable by patient history alone. The condition is characterized by pain often accompanied by a brief facial spasm or tic. Pain distribution is unilateral and follows the sensory distribution of cranial nerve V, typically radiating to the maxillary (V2) or mandibular (V3) area. At times, both distributions are affected. Physical examination eliminates alternative diagnoses. Signs of cranial nerve dysfunction or other neurologic abnormality exclude the diagnosis of idiopathic TN and suggest that pain may be secondary to a structural lesion.
Pathophysiology: The mechanism of pain production remains controversial. One theory suggests that peripheral injury or disease of the trigeminal nerve increases afferent firing in the nerve; failure of central inhibitory mechanisms may be involved as well. Pain is perceived when nociceptive neurons in a trigeminal nucleus involve thalamic relay neurons.
Aneurysms, tumors, chronic meningeal inflammation, or other lesions may irritate trigeminal nerve roots along the pons. An abnormal vascular course of the superior cerebellar artery is often cited as the cause. In most cases, no lesion is identified, and the etiology is labeled idiopathic by default. Uncommonly, an area of demyelination from multiple sclerosis may be the precipitant. Lesions of the entry zone of the trigeminal roots within the pons may cause a similar pain syndrome. Thus, although TN typically is caused by a dysfunction in the peripheral nervous system (the roots or trigeminal nerve itself), a lesion within the central nervous system may rarely cause similar problems.
Infrequently, adjacent dental fillings composed of dissimilar metals may trigger attacks.
Frequency:

Internationally: TN is uncommon, with an estimated prevalence of 155 cases per million persons.
Mortality/Morbidity:
No mortality is associated with idiopathic TN, although secondary depression is common if a chronic pain syndrome evolves. In rare cases, pain may be so frequent that oral nutrition is impaired.
In symptomatic or secondary TN, morbidity or mortality relates to the underlying cause of the pain syndrome.
Sex: Male-to-female ratio is 2:3.
Age: Development of trigeminal neuralgia in a young person suggests the possibility of multiple sclerosis.
Idiopathic TN typically occurs in patients in the sixth decade of life, but it may occur at any age.
Symptomatic or secondary TN tends to occur in younger patients.
27 Background: Trigeminal neuralgia (TN), also known as tic douloureux, is a pain syndrome recognizable by patient history alone. The condition is characterized by pain often accompanied by a brief facial spasm or tic. Pain distribution is unilateral and follows the sensory distribution of cranial nerve V, typically radiating to the maxillary (V2) or mandibular (V3) area. At times, both distributions are affected. Physical examination eliminates alternative diagnoses. Signs of cranial nerve dysfunction or other neurologic abnormality exclude the diagnosis of idiopathic TN and suggest that pain may be secondary to a structural lesion.
Pathophysiology: The mechanism of pain production remains controversial. One theory suggests that peripheral injury or disease of the trigeminal nerve increases afferent firing in the nerve; failure of central inhibitory mechanisms may be involved as well. Pain is perceived when nociceptive neurons in a trigeminal nucleus involve thalamic relay neurons.
Aneurysms, tumors, chronic meningeal inflammation, or other lesions may irritate trigeminal nerve roots along the pons. An abnormal vascular course of the superior cerebellar artery is often cited as the cause. In most cases, no lesion is identified, and the etiology is labeled idiopathic by default. Uncommonly, an area of demyelination from multiple sclerosis may be the precipitant. Lesions of the entry zone of the trigeminal roots within the pons may cause a similar pain syndrome. Thus, although TN typically is caused by a dysfunction in the peripheral nervous system (the roots or trigeminal nerve itself), a lesion within the central nervous system may rarely cause similar problems.
Infrequently, adjacent dental fillings composed of dissimilar metals may trigger attacks.
http://www.MyTrigeminalNeuralgiaStory.com

source

Total Body Therapy: Total Body Machine

Medicomat Total Body Machine – http://www.djorin.com – Distributors wanted – Total Body Therapy device treats many diseases, relieve pains and total improves metabolism, blood circulation, nervous system and immunity function.

Total Healthcare. Why is the BEST?
∙ Automatic Detection
∙ Automatic Therapy
∙ Effective Pain Relief
∙ Handheld, Easy to Use
∙ No Side Effects

∙ Early Diagnosis
∙ Total Therapy
∙ Natural Therapy
∙ Health Care
∙ Body Rejuvenation

source

Tinnitus Treatment Methods

►► http://howtocuretinnitus.stvae.com ◄◄ THE MOST POWERFUL NATURAL TREATMENT FOR TINNITUS THAT EXIST AND WORKS!!!

Tinnitus Treatment Methods

A Brief Look At Differing Tinnitus Treatment Methods

Since tinnitus can be an indication of a basic therapeutic condition, people ought to experience a full examination by an affirmed ear master. People ought to likewise have a complete therapeutic examination. Extraordinary consideration ought to be given to circulatory strain, kidney capacity, drug admission, eating regimen, and unfavorable susceptibilities, as these elements are here and there connected with tinnitus.

Right now, there is no single treatment for tinnitus. Tinnitus treatment for the most part includes a multi-disciplinary approach and incorporates a mixed bag of side effect administration techniques.

Ordinary Drug Therapy:

While numerous medications have been examined and used to ease tinnitus, there is no medication particularly intended for tinnitus treatment. For individuals with incessant tinnitus, drug medicines may offer some achievement. Drugs that have been mulled over and used to treat tinnitus incorporate hostile to nervousness, antidepressants, antihistamines, anticonvulsants and soporifics. While numerous individuals have been effective in better dealing with their tinnitus indications, drug treatment can have genuine reactions.

Elective Treatments:

Numerous individuals have encountered tinnitus alleviation from the utilization of natural arrangements, homeopathic cures, and vitamin and mineral regimens. Others have profited from needle therapy, cranio-sacral treatment, magnets, hyperbaric oxygen, or entrancing. A few people discover back rub treatment and vitality work, for example, reiki, to be helpful medicines for tinnitus. Albeit a few people have reported a mellow hypersensitive response to home grown arrangements, most option medicines convey almost no danger.

Cochlear Implants: A cochlear insert is a gadget that sends electrical sound from the ear to the mind. An anode is strung into the cochlea (winding molded cavity of the internal ear) and a recipient is embedded just underneath the skin behind the ear. Since anode implantation wrecks any staying sound hair cells, cochlear inserts are just endorsed to hard of hearing or close hard of hearing patients.

Tinnitus Maskers:

A non-restorative alternative used to diminish or “veil” undesirable commotion. Tinnitus maskers are worn like a portable hearing assistant to deliver an impartial white sound. More than 60% of patients with extreme tinnitus report alleviation. A more up to date gadget is a tinnitus instrument, which is a blend portable amplifier and masker. This gadget shows the cerebrum how to disregard tinnitus commotion. People must be tried and fitted for the tinnitus instrument.

Portable hearing assistants:

A few tinnitus patients with listening to misfortune experience aggregate or halfway tinnitus help while wearing portable amplifiers. Enhancement from the portable hearing assistant permits the help wearer to hear foundation sounds, which detracts from the attention on the tinnitus clamor.

Biofeedback: This unwinding strategy has a 25-year history of fruitful treatment for torment and anxiety related issue. Biofeedback shows individuals how to control certain body capacities including heartbeat, muscle strain and skin temperature. The objective when utilizing biofeedback for tinnitus treatment, is to reduction anxiety and uneasiness levels that may be adding to tinnitus. Biofeedback tinnitus treatment may oblige week after week sessions more than a while before change is taken note. Notwithstanding, up to 80% of patients discover some alleviation of their tinnitus manifestations and 20% have reported aggregate help.

cure for tinnitus
how to cure tinnitus naturally
natural cure for tinnitus
tinnitus natural remedy
cure tinnitus
cures for tinnitus
cure tinnitus naturally
natural cures for tinnitus
cures for tinnitus home remedies
tinnitus treatment natural
tinnitus natural cure
natural treatment for tinnitus
curing tinnitus
tinnitus cure
is there a cure for tinnitus
tinnitus homeopathic remedies
tinnitus treatment
home remedy for tinnitus
tinnitus causes
tinnitus miracle
tinnitus relief
ayurvedic home remedies
curing tinnitus naturally
tinnitus symptoms
treatment for tinnitus
what is tinnitus
pulsatile tinnitus
tinnitus retraining therapy
what causes tinnitus
causes of tinnitus
ear tinnitus home remedies
home remedies for constipation
tinnitus cures
tinitus
tinnitus home treatment
natural treatments for tinnitus
natural remedies for tinnitus
how to treat tinnitus
how to stop tinnitus
tinnitus medication
tinnitis
home remedies for acne
ginkgo biloba tinnitus
sore throat home remedies
home remedies for sore throat
tinnitus home remedies really work
tinitis
tinnitus cause
how to treat tinnitus natural remedy
tinnitus miracle review
tinnitus forum
treatment of tinnitus
a cure for tinnitus

source

The Solution of Headache

Surprising Ways to Fight Headache Pain
Description of the image
There are the obvious choices for zapping the pain,
such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

Tips for Taking Migraine and Headache Medications
You and your doctor are partners in developing, adjusting, and following an effective migraine or headache treatment plan. Make sure that you understand and share the same treatment goals as your doctor. Talk about what you expect from medications so you can know if your treatment plan is working.

Subscribe now

Apply an ice pack to the painful area of your head. Try placing it on your forehead, temples, or the back of your neck. Take a warm bath or shower; take a nap; or take a walk. Ask someone to rub your neck and back, or treat yourself to a massage.

Treating Your Own Headaches
Deep breathing, relaxing or using mental imagery can help people unwind and possibly help with headache too. Additional research is needed, however. A study of 90 people with tension headaches found that relaxation training improved their sleep more than acupuncture. Edmund Messina, MD, medical director of the Michigan Headache Clinic.

The Solution of Headache
Surprising Ways to Fight Headache Pain
Description of the image
There are the obvious choices for zapping the pain,
such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

Biofeedback
The technique of using monitoring devices to obtain information about an involuntary function of the central or autonomic nervous system, such as body temperature or blood pressure, in order to gain some voluntary control over the function.

Acupuncture
In acupuncture, thin needles are inserted under the skin to realign the flow of energy, or qi, in the body. A procedure used in or adapted from Chinese medical practice in which specific body areas are pierced with fine needles for therapeutic purposes or to relieve pain or produce regional anesthesia.

Stretching
Headache-relieving stretches can get at muscle tension that contributes to pain. Increasing flexibility through stretching is one of the basic tenets of physical fitness. They can be performed without any fancy equipment and only takes a few minutes whilst sitting at your desk.

Aerobics
Regular aerobic exercise, such as brisk walking, biking, or swimming, can reduce migraine intensity and frequency, according to the National Pain Foundation. In a small study in Headache two groups of migraine patients were randomly assigned to three months of yoga therapy or self care.

Meditation
Various meditation techniques can be used to focus attention and quiet the mind from distractions such as chronic pain. At this point, there is little data on the effect of meditation on migraines. Body connectedness—can reduce migraine frequency and severity and improve overall quality of life.

Relaxation exercises
Deep breathing, relaxing or using mental imagery can help people unwind and possibly help with headache too. Additional research is needed, however. A study of 90 people with tension headaches found that relaxation training improved their sleep more than acupuncture. Edmund Messina, MD, medical director of the Michigan Headache Clinic.

Avoid nitrates and nitrites
Doctors recommends avoiding headache-inducing substances, including nitrites and nitrates in processed meats and monosodium glutamate (MSG) used in foods as a flavor enhancer. Some heart medicines also contain nitrate. Caffeine, alcohol, phenylethylamine (found in chocolate and cheese), tyramine (found in nuts and fermented meats, cheeses, and soy), and aspartame (in many artificially sweetened foods) are headache triggers for some.

Electrode implants
People with intractable headaches may one day rely on electrodes implanted in the neck or brain to provide pain relief. One such therapy, called occipital nerve stimulation, appears promising in the treatment of cluster headaches and migraines, studies show, although larger studies are needed.

Thank you for watching video

source

Biofeedback: Managing Stress

Are you looking for a better way to manage stress? Dr. Diane Pege discusses the stress reduction technique of biofeedback. Biofeedback therapy teaches ways to tell your mind that are not really stressed and therefore stops the stress reaction.

source

Tourette syndrome

Tourette syndrome is an inherited neuropsychiatric disorder with onset in childhood, characterized by multiple physical tics and at least one vocal tic. These tics characteristically wax and wane, can be suppressed temporarily, and are preceded by a premonitory urge. Tourette’s is defined as part of a spectrum of tic disorders, which includes provisional, transient and persistent tics.

This video targeted to blind users.

Attribution:
Article text available under CC-BY-SA
Public domain image source in video

source